When social anxiety turns into selective mutism

When social anxiety turns into selective mutism

Selective mutism is an anxiety disorder that the American Psychological Association (APA) estimates affects approximately one in 1,000 children. Though the condition is typically diagnosed in childhood, most often between the ages of three and eight years old, selective mutism can follow an individual into adulthood if gone untreated. The symptoms of selective mutism vary depending on the individual and include the complete inability to speak, speaking to only select individuals or whispering. When the individual is comfortable within a setting, either at home or within certain communities, he or she is able to speak and interact. The condition is highly treatable, especially when diagnosed in youth.

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Practicing self-compassion combats narcissism

Practicing self-compassion combats narcissism

Narcissistic personality disorder affects approximately 6.2 percent of the U.S. population, according to the National Institutes of Health. Narcissistic traits, however, are more common in society. The prevalence of this general narcissism is the subject of much concern, dialogue and research, as selfies and mundane status updates fill social media sites each second. Researchers have determined methods of curbing narcissistic tendencies by practicing self-compassion in a culture that more readily encourages self-criticism. Read more

Friendship and cognitive health part 4: Laws of attraction

Friendship and cognitive health part 4: Laws of attraction

The laws of attraction with regard to friendships are complex. New research on the small but important transitions from “acquaintance” to “friend” to “best friend” indicates that these laws are even more complex and nuanced than previously believed. National Friendship Day provides a platform on which to explore these transitions and the differences between relationships. Read more

Friendship and Cognitive Health Part 3: Making friends with autism spectrum disorder

Friendship and Cognitive Health Part 3: Making friends with autism spectrum disorder

Building and maintaining friendships can prove difficult for teenagers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Basic social cues are often lost in translation. National Friendship Day is a time to shed light on the ways in which autistic children and teenagers can develop communication skills and build healthy relationships.

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Friendship and cognitive health part 2: Happiness is contagious among friends

Friendship and cognitive health part 2: Happiness is contagious among friends

Happiness truly is contagious, according to new research on the effects of emotions among social networks. Unhappiness is also somewhat contagious, meaning that an individual’s positive and negative emotions can directly affect the people around him or her (A Study to Smile About: Happiness Is Contagious). National Friendship Day brings the opportunity to examine the benefits of friendships and other social relationships. Read more