California Mental Health Helpline supports the advancement of research as well as the increased coverage of mental health issues in the news and local events. We strive to keep this stream of updates available to those who wish to keep up and learn more about personal experiences in the field as well. We also hope this information is able to inspire, inform and help readers.

For additional resources, please contact California Mental Health Helpline online or at 855-559-3923.

National IT Professionals Day part 2: Telehealth and using telecommuting for mental health treatment

National IT Professionals Day part 2: Telehealth and using telecommuting for mental health treatment

Telemedicine and telehealth were first developed over 40 years ago and are slowly making their way into mainstream health care in the United States. According to the American Telemedicine Association, over 50 percent of all hospitals nationwide now implement telemedicine, or “remote clinical services,” in some way. Telehealth is a broader term in the field of mental health information technology (IT) that includes telemedicine, training, administrative tasks and continuing education (CE) classes for professionals within a given field. This gives mental health professionals and those struggling with mental health issues more opportunities for communication and education. The third Tuesday of September each year is designated as National IT Professionals Day, providing an opportunity to further explore these uses of technology within the mental health care system. Read more

National IT Professionals Day part 1: Using IT systems to assist mental health care

National IT Professionals Day part 1: Using IT systems to assist mental health care

Technological advances are constantly being adopted in the medical field. However, when it comes to mental health care, these advances are slight. Despite legislation encouraging the implementation of information technology (IT) in this field, various issues keep hospitals, doctors and patients from using it to the fullest extent possible. In honor of National IT Professionals Day, which takes place on the third Tuesday of September each year, the ways in which technology can be used to improve quality and access to mental health care are being explored on a deeper level. Read more

BPD underdiagnosed in men

BPD underdiagnosed in men

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a mental health condition noted for its prevalence among women. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition indicates that 75 percent of BPD cases are diagnosed in females. For this reason, men struggling with BPD are often misdiagnosed and undertreated. As author and researcher Randi Kreger explains, “Most therapists are clueless that men also have BPD even though the most conservative estimates say in four BPD sufferers is male.” The National Institutes of Health (NIH) supports this statistic, reporting that approximately 75 percent of individuals diagnosed with BPD are female. This is partially due to the fact that the disorder presents itself differently in males than in females. The stigma and lack of understanding surrounding this reality makes its true prevalence in the male population unknown.

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When social anxiety turns into selective mutism

When social anxiety turns into selective mutism

Selective mutism is an anxiety disorder that the American Psychological Association (APA) estimates affects approximately one in 1,000 children. Though the condition is typically diagnosed in childhood, most often between the ages of three and eight years old, selective mutism can follow an individual into adulthood if gone untreated. The symptoms of selective mutism vary depending on the individual and include the complete inability to speak, speaking to only select individuals or whispering. When the individual is comfortable within a setting, either at home or within certain communities, he or she is able to speak and interact. The condition is highly treatable, especially when diagnosed in youth.

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Practicing self-compassion combats narcissism

Practicing self-compassion combats narcissism

Narcissistic personality disorder affects approximately 6.2 percent of the U.S. population, according to the National Institutes of Health. Narcissistic traits, however, are more common in society. The prevalence of this general narcissism is the subject of much concern, dialogue and research, as selfies and mundane status updates fill social media sites each second. Researchers have determined methods of curbing narcissistic tendencies by practicing self-compassion in a culture that more readily encourages self-criticism. Read more